HOMINID FOSSILS REPRODUCTIONS


Reproductions of hominid fossils at real size, the reproduction reference is under each description (link to prices in the menu). Images are often clickable to access other views of the reproduction. There may be some (small) color variations between actual reproductions and photos.

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-35 millions d'années

Aegyptopithecus zeuxis

Reproduction in bioplastic and resin, detailed, real size
from a skull of Aegyptopithecus zeuxis , (dawn monkey), a fossil genus of primates. The remains of Aegyptopithecus were discovered in 1966 in the Fayoum region (Egypt) it is dated from -37 to -29 million years ago, it is one of the first higher primates, that is to say, can -being, a common ancestor of hominids and great apes, the famous missing link sought for more than a century.
Size 10.5cm long Height 5cm Width 6cm, actual size 1:1 

REF: AEGYP-R
Aegyptopithecus zeuxis

-33 millions d'années

Parapithecus grangeri

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of a Parapithecus grangeri skull
It is an extinct genus of primates that lived during the late Eocene and early Oligocene in what is now Egypt. Its members are considered basal anthropoids and the genus is closely related to Apidium. There are two known species. They lived around 40 to 33 million years ago 

REF: PARAP
Parapithecus grangeri

-17 millions d'années

Afropithecus turkanensis

Detailed reproduction in bioplastic and resin, real size
of a partial skull of Afropithecus turkanensis , a primate fossil. It is dated 17 million years ago
It was discovered on the west side of Lake Turkana in 1986 and 46 additional fragmentary specimens were recovered there.
This skull has a narrow palate with distinctive incisors that appear to project forward into the upper jaw, and adult dentition 

REF: AfroT
main t-rex

-12 millions d'années

Proconsul

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of a Proconsul
The first known hominid or anthropoid is the Proconsul or Dryopithecus living approximately -20,000,000 to -10,000,000 years ago. A part will emigrate to Asia and give rise to the Ramapitheques. they will in turn give two different lineages; the first will evolve into the Orangutan, 12 million years ago, the second will give rise to the Gigantopithecus. The cranial capacity is between 160 and 300 cm3. The molars of all species have thin enamel and low cusps, which may indicate a diet of fruits and tender leaves. The African lineage of the Proconsul will give a common ancestor to Gorillas (Pan gorilla), Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes ) and Men.
The name Proconsul was chosen by its discoverer, Arthur Tindell Hopwood, in reference to a scientific chimpanzee named Consul who appeared in a comedy performed in London in the 1930s.
Age 18 M Years Discovered by Mary Leakey and her team on Rusinga Island, Lake Victoria, Kenya in 1948
size 11.5 high 12.5 long 

REF: proconsul-R
Proconsul

-7 millions d'années

Mesopithecus pentelici

Reproduction in bioplastic and resin of the skull of a Mesopithecus pentelici "middle ape" Europe and western Asia 7 to 5 million years ago (upper Miocene) Discovered by Wagner, 1839 in the locality of Pikermi Greece
Size length 11.5cm 

REF: MESOPI-R
Mesopithecus pentelici

-7 millions d'années

Sahelanthropus tchadensis

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of the skull of Sahelanthropus tchadensis, the oldest known species of the hominid group, close to the hominid-chimpanzee divergence, a 7 million year old pre-human
Nicknamed Toumaï, which means "hope of life" in the Goran language, was discovered in the Djourab desert, in northern Chad, on July 19, 2001 by Ahounta Djimdoumalbaye, a member of the Franco-Tchadian Paleoanthropological Mission (MPFT) led by Michel Brunet from the University of Poitiers. Djimdoumalbaye was attracted by a very irregular black stone which surfaced on the sand of the Chadian Sahel.
Cranial capacity (around 360-370 cm³)
Size length 17.5cm 

REF: Toumai-R
Sahelanthropus tchadensis toumaï

- 4.4 millions d'années

Ardipithecus ramidus

Reproduction in bioplastic and resin, life size,
of a skull of Ardipithecus ramidus In 1992 and 1993, Tim D. White, Gen Suwa and Berhane Asfaw discovered numerous primate fossils dated 4.4 million years ago at Aramis in Ethiopia. It appears to have been smaller than Australopithecus afarensis and has many traits intermediate between modern apes and Australopithecus afarensis, particularly its teeth. Its pelvis and hands show its bipedality. Its characteristics place it between primates and australopithecines.
Size Length 16 cm 

REF: RAMI-R
Ardipithecus ramidus

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foot of Ardipithecus ramidus

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of the bones of a foot of Ardipithecus ramidus
Ardipithecus is an extinct species of the hominid family belonging to the subtribe hominins, also called the human lineage. It lived in East Africa during the Early Pliocene, 4.4 million years ago. The most surprising aspect is probably the combination of a rather human pelvis and a foot with long, prehensile toes reminiscent of great apes. Ardipithecus ramidus would have been bipedal on the ground and would have moved using its four limbs in the trees, like certain great apes from the Miocene (22 to 6 Ma).
 
REF: Ram-foot
pied RAMIDUS

- 4.2 millions d'années

Australopithecus Anamensis Bones

Reproduction in bioplastic and resin, life size,
from a set of bones belonging to Australopithecus anamensis
It is the name of a bipedal hominid (named after the turcana word "Anam" meaning "lake" in recognition of the proximity of Lake Turkana) that lived between approximately 4.2 and 3.8 Ma BP1. It was defined in 1995 from a set of fossils discovered in East Africa, Kenya,
The first fossil was discovered in 1965 by a Harvard University expedition.
Composition:
The maxilla identified as KNM-KP 29283 was recovered from river deposits at Kanapoi which date from 4.17 to 4.07 Ma. discovered in 1997 Location of discovery: Kanapoi, Kenya
The type specimen of Australopithecus anamensis, KNM-KP 29281, is an adult mandible dated to approximately 4.1 Ma. Discovered in 1994 Location of discovery: Kanapoi, Kenya
KNM-KP 29285 has distal end of the tibia
KNM-KP 29285 b proximal end of the tibia
KNM-KP 271 Distal end of left humerus 

REF: Anam-bones
Australopithecus anamensis

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Skull of Australopithecus anamensis

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin,
of a skull of Australopithecus anamensis specimen MRD-VP-1
Discovered in 2016 in Ethiopia at the Woranso-Mille site by an international team led by Yohannes Haile-Selassie
Aged 3.8 million years ago, it is the oldest Australopithecus skull ever discovered.
The top of the skull has a well-developed sagittal crest. Its face is robust, long and prognathic. Its highly developed canines

REF: Anam-mrd
crâne d'Australopithecus anamensis

- 3.5 millions d'années

Australopithecus afarensis Lucy

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin, of a skull of Australopithecus afarensis designated Lucy (in reference to the song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds by the Beatles)
It was discovered on November 24, 1974 in the Afar depression in northeastern Ethiopia by Donald Johanson, Maurice Taieb, Yves Coppens
Lucy is quite possibly the most famous prehistoric skeleton of all time. With fifty-two bones, or 40% of her skeleton, Lucy is, along with some Australopithecus africanus from Sterkfontein Cave in South Africa, one of the hominids of more than three million years old, the most complete known.
4.1 to 3 million years old Cranial capacity 380 to 430 cm³ Lucy was 1.10 m tall and weighed 30 kg
Casting scale 1:1 long skull 18cm

REF: LUCYM2-R
Australopithecus afarensis Lucy

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Pelvis of Australopithecus Afarensis LUCY

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of the 5 bones constituting the Pelvis of Australopithecus Afarensis LUCY

The discovered skeleton of Lucy in fact includes fragments of 52 bones including a mandible, elements of the skull and upper limbs, and part of the pelvis and femur. These latter elements proved extremely important for reconstructing the locomotion of the species. Australopithecus afarensis.
If Lucy was incontestably capable of bipedal locomotion, as indicated by her head posture, the curvature of her spine, the shape of her pelvis and her femur, she must still have been partially arboreal: as proof, her upper limbs were a little longer than its lower limbs 

REF: Lucy-bones
Bassin de l'Australopithèque Afarensis LUCY

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Australopithecus afarensis Al-444

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Australopithecus afarensis specimen Al-444 Male.
It was discovered by William Kimbel and Yoel Rak in 1991 in Hadar, Ethiopia.
It is a relatively complete skull attributed to an adult male, cranial capacity of 550 cm3. Its age is estimated at 3 million years. 

REF: AL444
afarensis spécimen Al-444

- 3.5 millions d'années

Kenyanthropus platyops

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of a skull of Kenyanthropus platyops "Kenya flat-faced man", discovered in 1999 by Meave Leakey's team, on the west shore of Lake Turkana, in Kenya
Several theories clash over the place of Kenyanthopus platyops in the hominid family tree, the species remains an enigma 3.5 to 3.2 million years old Cranial capacity 450/530cc
size long 18.5 cm  

REF: PLATYOPS-R
Kenyanthropus platyops

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Kenyanthropus platyops KNMWT 8556

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of a fragment of the lower jaw Kenyanthropus platyops KNMWT 8556 , discovered by Peter Nzube Mutiwa in 1982 in Lomekwi, west of Turkana. This jaw is a partial straight mandible with dentition. It comes from the same area where additional remains of Kenyanthropus platyops, including KNMWT 40000, KNMWT 40001 and some 31 isolated teeth and lower jaw fragments of other individuals, were discovered between 1982 and 1999
Age approx. 3.50 million years 

REF: PLAT38350MAX
Kenyanthropus platyops KNMWT 8556

-3.5 millions d'années

Skull Australopithecus Africanus Ples

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of an Australopithecus Africanus skull known as Mrs Ples (short for Plesianthropus, which means "almost man")
It was discovered in the quarries of Sterkfontein (South Africa), on April 16, 1947, by Robert Broom and John T. Robinson
Discoveries of adult fossils like Mrs Ples have helped convince scientists that South African australopithecines are closely related to humans and that Africa is the cradle of humanity. 2.5 to 3.5 million years Cranial capacity 450 to 500 cm³
Casting scale 1:1 long skull 18cm 

REF: PLES-R
crâne d' Australopithecus Africanus

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Skull of Australopithecus afarensis Al-333

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Australopithecus afarensis specimen Al-333 45 .
It is a set of bones and teeth, discovered in 1975 by Donald Johanson Hadar's team in Ethiopia. The skull is reconstructed, based on the almost complete rear part of the skull (left temporal, left parietal and left occipital and right temporal) and various pieces (13 in total) from various individuals. Its Afarensis classification is controversial (reported to A. afarensis by DC Johanson, TD White and Y. Coppens (1978) but attributed by TR Oison (1981) to Paranthropus Dating 3.2 million years ago 

REF: AL333
Australopithecus afarensis Al-333

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Australopithecus africanus Taung's child

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of the skull of a young Australopithecus africanus named Taung's Child
Mr. de Bruyn “accidentally” discovered the skull, endocranium and mandible of a child in 1924 while operating his quarry in Taung, South Africa. Raymond DART, professor at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, studied the fossil and published Taung's child in 1925 under the species name Australopithecus africanus.
This fossil consists of most of the face and the lower jaw with teeth and, uniquely, the endocast of the brain (fossilization of the internal part of the skull leaving the natural cast of the brain). age of this child was 3 years old at the time of his death
2.5 million years old Skull size 14 cm x 11 cm 

REF: TAUNG-R
Australopithecus africanus L'enfant de Taung

-2.7 millions d'années

Skull of Australopithecus aethiopicus

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Australopithecus aethiopicus KNM-WT 17000 (also classified as Paranthropus aethiopicus) nicknamed the "Black Skull" , because of its black coloring, due to the richness in manganese dioxide of the sediment from which it comes
Discovered in 1985, very well preserved, in sediments of the Nachukui formation, west of Lake Turkana, it has a sagittal crest even more marked than that of other species of the genus Paranthropus. The first elements of this species were discovered in Ethiopia in 1967 by Camille Arambourg and Yves Coppens. He would have lived between 2.3 and 2.7 million years ago skull Age: 2.5 million years Brain volume of 410 cc
Long size 20 cm 

REF: BLACKS-R
crâne d'Australopithecus aethiopicus

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Mandible of Australopithecus aethiopicus

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of a partial lower mandible of Australopithecus aethiopicus specimen KNMWT 16005 with a large part of its dentition, was found in 1985 in West Turkana, at a site near the Kangatukuseo sand river, 19 meters above the Lokalalei tuff which is dated 2.53 million years old. 

REF: Aethio-max

Possibility of associating it, for example, with the skull of aethiopicus ref: BLACKS-R the correspondence is quite good

Mandibule Australopithecus aethiopicus

-2.5 millions d'années

Lower jaw of Gigantopithecus blacki 

Bioplastic and resin reproduction of the lower jaw of Gigantopithecus blacki ,
giant primate of the hominid family (Hominidae), Pleistocene (- 2.5 million years ago - 100,000 years ago) from southern China, northern India, Pakistan, Indonesia and Vietnam Its size, estimated at three meters in height, would make him the largest primate (Primates) to have ever existed; he would then have weighed between 300 and 640 kilograms

REF: GIGANT-R
Maxillaire Gigantopithecus blacki

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Gigantopithecus blacki

Reproduction in bioplastic and resin of the skull of Gigantopithecus blacki , based on the lower maxilla discovered in 1956. Three mandibles and more than a thousand isolated teeth have been discovered to date
The Gigantopithecus is a giant primate of the hominid family (Hominidae), Pleistocene (- 2.5 million years ago - 100,000 years ago) from southern China, northern India, Pakistan, Indonesia and Vietnam. size, estimated at three meters in height, would make him the largest primate (Primates) to have ever existed; he would then have weighed between 300 and 640 kilograms
To date, we distinguish 2 types of Gigantopithecus:
Gigantopithecus bilaspurensis (or Gigantopithecus giganteus), in northern India and Pakistan. She lived in the Late Miocene, 9 to 5 million years before present. She is smaller in size.
Gigantopithecus blacki, in southern China and northern Vietnam. It lived in the Middle Pleistocene, perhaps as much as 100,000 years before present. It's the giant species   

REF: GIGANT-FULL-R
Gigantopithecus blacki

-2.4 millions d'années

Skull of Homo rudolfensis

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Homo rudolfensis specimen designated under the reference KNM-ER-1470' discovered in Koobi Fora, Kenya by Bernard Ngeneo in 1972 in the Turkana deposit

These remains were first attributed to Homo habilis then declared as the holotype of a new species: Homo rudolfensis, from the old name of Lake Turkana, Rodolphe The cranial capacity of Homo rudolfensis is 750 cm³ on average .
It is therefore comparable or even superior to that of Homo habilis. H. rudolfensis measured approximately 1.60 m and weighed approximately 50 kg. The discovery of Homo rudolfensis has an importance in our idea of ​​evolution within the human race: it breaks the simplistic idea of ​​an evolution of 'Homo habilis towards Home erectus then finally towards Home sapiens
Age: from -2.4 to -1.7 million years
casting size (scale 1:1) 20 x 15 x 13 

REF: RUDOLF-R
crâne d' Homo rudolfensis

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Mandible of Homo rudolfensis knmer 60000

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a mandible of Homo rudolfensis knmer 60000
Discovered in 2009 by Cyprian Nyete east of Lake Turkana
This is a nearly complete lower jaw of Homo rudolfensis with a full set of teeth. Its characteristic small front teeth (incisors) and flat profile across the incisors conform to the shape of the newly published specimen KNM-ER 62000 and the skull KNM-ER 1470 

REF: RUDOLF-max
mandibule d' Homo rudolfensis

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Mandible of Homo rudolfensis KNMER 1802

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a mandible of Homo rudolfensis KNMER 1802
It is a young adult, discovered in 1973 by John Harris, Koobi Fora, on the east side of Lake Turkana
The specimen has been assigned to different species, namely Homo rudolfensis or Homo habilis. It shows similarities to a mandible found in deposits near Lake Malawi 

REF: KN1802-max
mandibule d'Homo rudolfensis KNMER 1802

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