HOMINID FOSSILS 2


Full-size reproductions of hominid fossils, the reproduction reference is under each description (link to prices in the menu). Images are often clickable to access other views of the reproduction. There may be some (small) color variations between actual reproductions and photos.

.

-2.2 millions d'années

Skull of Paranthropus robustus SK-48

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a Paranthropus robustus skull SK-48 (or formerly classified as Australopithecus robustus) discovered by Robert Broom in 1948 in Swartkrans, South Africa
Age: from - 2.2 to - 1 million years for the species Brain volume from 450 to 500 cc Paranthropus robustus is the last representative of the paranthropes. It lived at the same time and in the same places as certain representatives of the genera Australopithecus and Homo, which illustrates the bushy nature of the human lineage Size long 16.5 cm 

REF: ROB SK48
Paranthropus robustus

-2 millions d'années

Paranthropus robustus DNH 7

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Paranthropus robustus DNH 7 (or formerly classified as Australopithecus robustus)
It was discovered by A. Keyser's team in 1994 on the Drimolen site in South Africa. It is one of the most complete skulls of Australopithecus robustus and is presumed to be female.
1.5 to 2 million years 

REF: ROB DNH7
Paranthropus robustus DNH 7

-1.95 millions d'années

Skull of Australopithecus Sediba

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin,
of a skull of Australopithecus Sediba with lower maxilla
Australopithecus sediba is a species of the genus Australopithecus discovered in 2010 by Lee R. Berger and his team. Paleontologists came across two fairly complete skeletons of a young male and a female as well as the isolated tibia of an adult. Australopithecus sediba, a species defined from a fossil discovered in a cave in Malapa, could represent an intermediate form between the first australopithecines and the genus Homo. Australopithecus sediba lived approximately 1.95 to 1.78 million years ago, during the Pleistocene, in what is now South Africa. Anatomically, Australopithecus sediba shows a mixture of primitive and very modern traits according to the concept of mosaic evolution 

REF: SEDI-R
crâne d'Australopithecus Sediba

-1.9 millions d'années

Skull of Homo Habilis

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin,
of a skull of Homo Habilis specimen designated under the reference KNM-ER 1813
(discovered in Koobi Fora, Kenya by Kamoya Kimeu in 1973)
1.9 million years old Cranial capacity 510cc
Size long 17 cm

REF: habilis-1813-R
crâne d' Homo Habilis

.

Maxilla Homo Habilis KNM-ER 1805

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of the upper jaw of a Homo Habilis KNM-ER 1805
It was discovered by Paul Abel in 1973, on the Karari Ridge, east of Turkana. The specimen (composed of 3 parts, skull cap, partial upper maxilla, and mandible fragment) was preserved in a limestone layer and was therefore very difficult to extract. It has a small sagittal crest running along the top of the skull suggesting that it was a male individual. The cranial capacity is 582 cm34 The teeth are quite flared because the bone is deformed, but their relatively small size suggests that this specimen may belong to the group of hominids that have been called Homo habilis, which includes the female skull KNMER 1813.
Age approx. 1.85 Million 

REF: HAB1805MAX
Homo Habilis KNM-ER 1805

-1.8 millions d'années

Skull of Homo Habilis OH24 TWIGGY

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin,
of a skull of Homo Habilis specimen designated under the reference OH24 TWIGGY dated approximately 1.8 million years old discovered in the Olduvai Gorge, in October 1968, by Peter Nzube
The skull was discovered very flattened and eroded. Some of the fragments could be recovered and allowed a careful and complicated reconstruction
Cranial capacity 600cc   

REF: habOH24
Homo Habilis OH24 TWIGGY

- 1.8 millions d'années

Skull of Australopithecus Boisei OH 5

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of an Australopithecus skull specimen OH 5 (Paranthropus boisei) discovered in 1959 at Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania by Mary Leakey.
Cranial volume 530 cc
This skull is nicknamed "Nutcracker Man" Olduvai Gorge Tanzania 1.75 million years old
Long size 20 cm 

REF: austral-oh5-R
Australopithecus Boisei OH 5

.

Mandible Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) KNM-ER 1477

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a partial lower mandible of Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) KNM-ER 1477 This lower jaw was discovered by M. Mbithi in 1972 near Eastern Turkana. It is an immature mandible which would have belonged to a 3-year-old Paranthropus boisei. He has his juvenile canines and molars but is missing the tiny front incisors. Age 1.9M

REF: Boi1477juv-max
Boi1477juv-max

.

Mandible Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) KNM-ER 3230

Bioplastic and resin reproduction of a partial lower mandible of Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) KNM-ER 3230 which was found in 1974. It was discovered during an archaeological excavation led by Glynn Isaac next to Lake Turkana
The broad, robust lower jaw must have belonged to a male individual of Paranthropus boisei, the same species as OH5 Zinjanthopus from Olduvai Gorge

REF: Boi3230-max

Possibility of associating it for example with the boisei OH5 skull ref: austral-oh5-R the correspondence is quite good
(Paranthropus boisei) KNM-ER 3230

.

Mandible Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) KNM-ER 729

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin,
a mandible of Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) KNM-ER 729
Discovered by Paul Abel in 1970, near Ileret, on the east side of Lake Turkana, this imposing, fairly complete lower jaw was attributed to Paranthropus boisei. It comes from a massive adult male and has the roots and crowns of most teeth. It can be compared to other robust mandibles belonging to Paranthropus boisei such as the Peninj mandible from Lake Natron 

REF: Boi729-max
Mandibule Australopithecus

.

Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) Female KNM-ER 732

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of an Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) skull, female KNM-ER 732
Discovered by Richard Leakey and H. Mutua in 1970 at the Koobi Fora site, Kenya Age 1.7 MA
This partial skull of a female Paranthropus boisei has many characteristics of P. boisei.
Most notable is the root placed toward the front of the zygomatic arch, resulting in a broad, flat face.
This skull has a cranial capacity of 500 cc, almost identical to the 510 cc of putative male P. boisei KNM-ER 406.
the face is overall less massive and it does not have a sagittal crest.
From this, scientists conclude that KNM-ER 732 represents a female of the species Paranthropus boisei.
This fossil provides clues to the nature of sexual dimorphism in this early human species.

REF: Boi732F
Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) Femelle KNM-ER 732

.

Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) Male KNM-ER 406

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Australopithecus Paranthropus boisei Male KNM-ER 406 ,
it was first identified as Zinjanthropus boisei) discovered in 1969 at Lake Turkana Kenya by Richard Leakey. Cranial volume 530 cc
This skull is specimen KNM-ER 406. 1.7 million years old
Skull size 20cm long 17 wide 

REF: KN406Max-R
crâne Australopithecus Paranthropus boisei Male KNM-ER 406,

.

Skull of Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) KNM WT 17400

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of an Australopithecus skull (Paranthropus boisei) KNM WT 17400 , West Turkana, Kenya Discovered by Richard Leakey, and Alan Walker in 1984
He is a young adult, the last molars are not completely erupted yet. 

REF: KN17400
crâne d' Australopithecus (Paranthropus boisei) KNM WT 17400

- 1.8 millions d'années

Homo ERGASTER Skull KNM-ER 3733

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Homo ERGASTER specimen designated under the reference KNM-ER 3733 (discovered in Koobi Fora, Kenya by Bernard Ngeneo in 1975) 1.75 million years old Cranial capacity 850cc The skull is that of a mature woman For some, Homo ergaster is the precursor of homo erectus. For others it is a species which has developed separately
Size approximately 20x14x13

REF: ergaster-3733-R
Crâne Homo ERGASTER KNM-ER 3733

.

Homo ergaster skull "Turkana Boy"

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin,
of the skull and lower jaw of the homo ergaster "Turkana Boy" It is part of the skeleton of a young specimen exhumed in Nariokotome in 1984, west of Lake Turkana (Kenya) and nicknamed "Turkana Boy" or. “Nariokotome Boy” This discovery represents the most complete ancient hominid skeleton ever discovered, with the complete skull and most postcranial material intact. This specimen has been assigned to the species Homo ergaster, although some researchers believe it belongs to Homo erectus.
Casting scale 1:1 long skull 19cm   

REF: TURK-R
homo ergaster

-1.8 millions d'années

Skull of Homo Erectus Georgicus Dmanisi 3 D2700

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of a skull of Homo Erectus specimen Georgicus Dmanisi 3 , designated under the reference D2700 (mandible D2735 ) (discovered in Dmanisi, in the Caucasus (Republic of Georgia) in 2001
5 skulls were discovered at the prehistoric site of Dmanisi between 1999 and 2005, by an international team including Georgian scientist David Lordkipanidze
The smallest skull, D2700. Homo georgicus presents characters considered intermediate between African Homo habilis and Asian Homo erectus. His height is estimated at 1.50 m.
1.8 million years old Cranial capacity 600/700 cc
Size long 17 cm

REF: EREC-GM-R
Crâne d'Homo Erectus Georgicus Dmanisi 3

.

Skull of Homo Erectus Dmanisi 1 D2280

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Homo Erectus specimen Dmanisi 1 designated under the reference D2280 (discovered in Dmanisi, in the Caucasus (Republic of Georgia), it was discovered during the 1999 excavations. C is the first of five skulls discovered from 1999 to 2005. Its endocranial capacity is the largest of the 5 with 770cm3

REF: DMA1
Crâne d'Homo Erectus Dmanisi 1 D2280

.

Skull of Homo Erectus Dmanisi 2 D2282

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Homo Erectus specimen Dmanisi 2 , designated under the reference D2282 (discovered in Dmanisi, in the Caucasus (Republic of Georgia), it was discovered during the excavations of 1999 and its mandible (D211) in 1991. It is the second of five skulls discovered from 1999 to 2005. Its endocranial capacity is between 625 and 730 cm3

REF: DMA2
Skull of Homo Erectus Dmanisi 2 D2282

.

Skull of Homo Erectus Dmanisi 4 D3444

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Homo Erectus specimen Dmanisi 4 designated under the reference D3444 (discovered in Dmanisi, in the Caucasus (Republic of Georgia), it was discovered during the 2002 excavations and its mandible (D3900) in 2003. It is difficult to know if the absence of teeth comes from age or a pathology. It is the fourth of five skulls discovered from 1999 to 2005. Its endocranial capacity is 630 cm3

REF: DMA4
Skull of Homo Erectus Dmanisi 4 D3444

.

Skull of Homo Erectus Dmanisi 5 D4500

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of Homo Erectus specimen Dmanisi 5 , designated under the reference D4500 (discovered in Dmanisi, in the Caucasus (Republic of Georgia) and mandible D2600 Discovered in 2005, it is the skull most complete of the genus Homo for the Pleistocene and the oldest representative of the genus homo to have been discovered outside of Africa. Despite the small size of its brain (546 cm3, approximately the same volume as in a male Australopithecus), all the. characteristics of Homo erectus are clearly visible. The brain volume of the other 4 individuals found in Dmanisi ranges from 601 to 730 cm31

REF: DMA5
Skull of Homo Erectus Dmanisi 5 D4500

-1.7 millions d'années

Skull Homo erectus (formerly Java Pithecanthropus) Sangiran 2

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of an erectus skull (formerly Java Pithecanthropus) Sangiran 2
Sangiran 2 is a skull cap discovered by Gustav von Koenigswald in 1937. This fossil was attributed to the species Pithecanthropus erectus, which later became Homo erectus. This is probably an adult female. 

REF: SANGI2
erectus  Sangiran 2

.

Skull Homo erectus (formerly Java Pithecanthropus) Sangiran 17

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of an erectus skull (formerly Java Pithecanthropus) Sangiran 17
Discovered by Sastrohamidjojo Sartono in 1969 in Sangiran on the island of Java Many bones and skulls were found on this island, the first in 1891 by Eugène Dubois, a young Dutch anatomist. This is a fairly complete skull, with a size of the brain of approximately 1000 cc It is the most complete Homo erectus fossil from Java
Age: first dated 800,000 years ago, a more recent study dates it to 1.7 million which means that Homo erectus would have migrated out of Africa much earlier than previously thought
Size long 22 cm

REF: PITHE-R
crâne d'erectus (ex Pithécanthrope de java) Sangiran 17

-1.6 millions d'années

Skull and jaw Meganthropus palaeojavanicus

Life-size bioplastic and resin reproduction of the skull and lower jaw of Meganthropus palaeojavanicus , from various fragments found at the Sangiran site, near Surakarta, in central Java in 1941. Six fossils from different individuals were discovered , these are fossils of a giant-sized hominid (between 2.40 m and 2.75 m) having lived between -1.4 million and -900,000 years ago. The taxonomy and phylogeny of these giant fossils (which have been authenticated) remains uncertain, as many paleoanthropologists consider them to be archaic Homo erectus, and others to consider them a variety of Australopithecines. 

REF: MEGANT
crâne et mâchoire Meganthropus palaeojavanicus

-1.55 millions d'années

Young homo erectus skull KNM-ER 42700

Reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a skull of a young homo erectus KNM-ER 42700 , Discovered at Fora Koobi, Kenya in 2000 by a team led by Meave Leakey Dating around 1.55 million years This skull of a young adult has the one of the smallest brain sizes known in Homo erectus, similar to the brain size seen in some Homo habilis fossils, but it has features more similar to other Homo erectus skulls. It was found in an area of ​​northern Kenya where younger Homo habilis fossils were found, demonstrating that these two species existed at the same time, rather than H. habilis being the ancestor of H. erectus 

REF: erec-42700
Crâne jeune homo erectus KNM-ER 42700

-1.5 millions d'années

Mandible of Homo erectus ERGASTER KNMER 820

Life-size reproduction in bioplastic and resin of a mandible of Homo erectus ERGASTER KNMER 820
This lower jaw belonged to a young Homo erectus. It was found by Harrison Mutua at Koobi Fora 1973
The lower jaw has its juvenile canines and first and second molars in place

REF: KN820-max
Mandible of Homo erectus ERGASTER KNMER 820

.

actual page: 2

.